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@ChawtonHouseLibrary

Happy Mothering Sunday!
In celebration of this special day, we take a look at some of the early nineteenth-century parenting books on our shelves. These include such pearls of wisdom as 'knives are improper playthings' among others!
chawtonhouse.org/2017/03/happy-mothering-sunday/
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Happy Mothering Sunday!
In celebration of this special day, we take a look at some of the early nineteenth-century parenting books on our shelves. These include such pearls of wisdom as knives are improper playthings among others!
https://chawtonhouse.org/2017/03/happy-mothering-sunday/

Haywood scholar Patrick Spedding has written a lovely blogpost about our current exhibition, all the way from Australia: patrickspedding.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/first-exhibition-to-focus-on-eliza.html ... See moreSee less

Haywood scholar Patrick Spedding has written a lovely blogpost about our current exhibition, all the way from Australia: http://patrickspedding.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/first-exhibition-to-focus-on-eliza.html

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Jamie Andrew Hayward

Fantastic!

Last night’s recital "Jane’s History: A Theatrical Concert of Pincushion Wit" was a riotous success, thanks to the stunning and playful performances of the musicians (pictured).

The programme wove together a context of Georgian vocal works, from Faustina Hasse Hodges’ hilarious "The Indignant Spinster" to selections of Haydn from Lady Emma Hamilton’s songbook. The performance culminated in an operatic rendition of Jane Austen’s childhood work "A History of England", complete with costumes and a gleefully villainous Queen Elizabeth I.
... See moreSee less

Last night’s recital Jane’s History: A Theatrical Concert of Pincushion Wit was a riotous success, thanks to the stunning and playful performances of the musicians (pictured).The programme wove together a context of Georgian vocal works, from Faustina Hasse Hodges’ hilarious The Indignant Spinster to selections of Haydn from Lady Emma Hamilton’s songbook. The performance culminated in an operatic rendition of Jane Austen’s childhood work A History of England, complete with costumes and a gleefully villainous Queen Elizabeth I.